Egypt

Posts tagged “Egypt”

Human rights group files complaint against telecom chiefs for blackout

“The Arabic Network for Human Rights Information (ANHRI) yesterday filed a complaint with the prosecutor general demanding an investigation into both the minister of communications, and chairman of the National Telecommunications Authority’s criminal role in harming and killing demonstrators by cutting off internet and telecommunication services in Egypt.

Demonstrators in Tahrir Square, including ANHRI’s team were surprised on the evening of January 25 by the interruption of telecommunications services, which the group says caused financial consequences and caused their families to panic. Cell phone service was cut for a day, with limited service after that for weeks in Tahrir Square, and internet was also down for more than five days, exposing protesters to deadly risks as those who were injured were unable to get immediate medical attention. Many died because they could not reach hospitals, said The Arabic Network for Human Rights Information in a statement on Thursday.”

From Al Masry Al Youm

Human rights group files complaint against telecom chiefs for blackout

“The Arabic Network for Human Rights Information (ANHRI) filed a complaint with the prosecutor general demanding an investigation into both the minister of communications, and chairman of the National Telecommunications Authority’s criminal role in harming and killing demonstrators by cutting off internet and telecommunication services in Egypt.

Demonstrators in Tahrir Square were surprised on the evening of January 25 by the interruption of telecommunications services, which ANHRI says caused financial consequences and caused their families to panic. The disruptions in mobile and Internet connectivity exposed protesters to deadly risks, as those who were injured were unable to get immediate medical attention.”

From Al-Masry Al-Youm

The truth about Twitter, Facebook and the uprisings in the Arab world

“As commentators have tried to imagine the nature of the uprisings, they have attempted to cast them as many things: as an Arab version of the eastern European revolutions of 1989 or something akin to the Iranian revolution that toppled the Shah in 1979. Most often, though, they have tried to conceive them through the media that informed them – as the result of WikiLeaks, as “Twitter revolutions” or inspired by Facebook.

Precisely how we communicate in these moments of historic crisis and transformation is important. The medium that carries the message shapes and defines as well as the message itself. The instantaneous nature of how social media communicate self-broadcast ideas, unlimited by publication deadlines and broadcast news slots, explains in part the speed at which these revolutions have unravelled, their almost viral spread across a region. It explains, too, the often loose and non-hierarchical organisation of the protest movements unconsciously modelled on the networks of the web.”

From The Guardian

Libya’s ‘Love Revolution’: Muslim Dating Site Seeds Protest

“When Omar Shibliy Mahmoudi exchanged sweet nothings on the Muslim dating site Mawada, it wasn’t for love but for liberty.

To avoid detection by Libyan secret police, who monitor Facebook and Twitter, Mahmoudi, the leader of the Ekhtalef (“Difference”) Movement, used what’s considered the Match.com of the Middle East to send coded love letters to rally the revolution.

On the site, the revolutionaries used poetry laced with revolutionary references to gauge support and make initial contact. Then they had detailed follow-up conversations via text message and Yahoo Messenger.”

From ABC News

Libya faces internet blackouts amid protests

“Libya is the latest North African country to experience internet trouble as democratic protests continue to sweep the region.

The massive Saharan country, long controlled by the dictator Moammar Gadhafi, has suffered “rolling blackouts” of its internet connections during the regime’s ongoing violent crackdown on protestors, according to the internet traffic monitor Renesys.

The cause of these internet service cuts, however, remains uncertain. Possibilities include a government crackdown, an internet traffic overload or simple power outages, said Jim Cowie, Renesys’ co-founder.”

From CNN

Libyans hope their revolution will also be tweeted

“Opposition to Muammar Gaddafi was inconceivable in Libya for four decades. But that was before the Tunisian and Egyptian uprisings embraced the power of the Internet. Now Libyans are hoping their revolution will also be tweeted.

This week, the video-sharing Web site YouTube was inundated by amateur footage of violent anti-government protests that rocked the second-largest city of Benghazi Tuesday.

The footage was picked up by major international news organisations and a multitude of Twitter users and Facebook pages as Libyan opposition groups prepared for Thursday’s “Day of Rage”.”

From France24

Egypt Leaders Found ‘Off’ Switch for Internet

“Epitaphs for the Mubarak government all note that the mobilizing power of the Internet was one of the Egyptian opposition’s most potent weapons. But quickly lost in the swirl of revolution was the government’s ferocious counterattack, a dark achievement that many had thought impossible in the age of global connectedness. In a span of minutes just after midnight on Jan. 28, a technologically advanced, densely wired country with more than 20 million people online was essentially severed from the global Internet.”

From The New York Times

Facebook Officials Keep Quiet on Its Role in Revolts

“With Facebook playing a starring role in the revolts that toppled governments in Tunisia and Egypt, you might think the company’s top executives would use this historic moment to highlight its role as the platform for democratic change. Instead, they really do not want to talk about it.

The social media giant finds itself under countervailing pressures after the uprisings in the Middle East. While it has become one of the primary tools for activists to mobilize protests and share information, Facebook does not want to be seen as picking sides for fear that some countries — like Syria, where it just gained a foothold — would impose restrictions on its use or more closely monitor users, according to some company executives who spoke on the condition of anonymity because they were discussing internal business.”

From The New York Times

U.S. Policy to Address Internet Freedom

“Days after Facebook and Twitter added fuel to a revolt in Egypt, the Obama administration plans to announce a new policy on Internet freedom, designed to help people get around barriers in cyberspace while making it harder for autocratic governments to use the same technology to repress dissent.

Ron Deibert, the director of the Citizen Lab at the University of Toronto, said that governments had been shifting from blocking the Internet to hacking and disabling it. Even in the United States, he noted, the Senate is considering a bill that would allow the president to switch off the Internet in the event of a catastrophic cyberattack.”

From The New York Times