Internet Law

Posts tagged “Internet Law”

The Arab Spring’s online backlash

Source: The Economist

A bill on “information-technology crimes” with extraordinarily broad wording and harsh punishments is due to come before Iraq’s parliament in April, once the dignitaries and television cameras at this week’s Arab League summit in Baghdad have departed.

David Cameron considers banning suspected rioters from social media

Source: Josh Halliday, The Guardian

David Cameron has told parliament that in the wake of this week’s riots the government is looking at banning people from using social networking sites such as Twitter and Facebook if they are thought to be plotting criminal activity.

The prime minister said the government will review whether it is possible to stop suspected rioters spreading online messages, in his opening statement during a Commons debate on Thursday on the widespread civil disorder for which MPs were recalled from their summer recess.

The legislation that could kill internet privacy for good

Source: Conor Friedersdorf, The Atlantic

Every right-thinking person abhors child pornography. To combat it, legislators have brought through committee a poorly conceived, over-broad Congressional bill, The Protecting Children from Internet Pornographers Act of 2011. It is arguably the biggest threat to civil liberties now under consideration in the United States. The potential victims: everyone who uses the Internet.

The good news? It hasn’t gone before the full House yet.

The bad news: it already made it through committee. And history shows that in times of moral panic, overly broad legislation has a way of becoming law. In fact, a particular moment comes to mind.

British Telecom ordered to blacklist Usenet search engine

Source: Timothy Lee, Ars Technica

A judge has ordered British Telecom to begin blocking its subscribers from accessing Newzbin2, a members-only usenet search engine that is heavily used for copyright infringement. The mandated blocking is modeled on the Cleanfeed filtering system currently used to block alleged child pornography.

The ruling represents a first step toward broader use of Internet filtering as a tool for blocking copyright infringement in the UK. “The Studios have made it clear that this is a test case,” the judge wrote. “If they are successful in obtaining an order against BT, then they intend to seek similar orders against all the other significant ISPs in the UK.”

For full original article, see here