Search Results for: ramy raoof

Ramy Raoof Joins Tor Project Board of Directors

Citizen Lab Research Fellow Ramy Raoof has recently joined the Board of Directors for the Tor Project. Raoof will bring his background as a technologist and security researcher to help the organization establish and strengthen mechanisms for community participation and transparency.

Secure Your Chats: Why Encrypted Messaging Matters

End-to-end encrypted messaging is effective at protecting the content of your messages from being read as they travel across the Internet to your friends and family. This is why the Citizen Lab has released Secure Your Chats: a Net Alert resource that outlines how to safely use end-to-end encryption.

Protect your Digital Presence with Secure Accounts

Citizen Lab, along with partners Open Effect, the University of New Mexico, and comic book artist Jason Li, have launched Secure Accounts as a free resource to help users better understand potential threats to their online identities and the steps they can take to protect themselves.

Libyans hope their revolution will also be tweeted

“Opposition to Muammar Gaddafi was inconceivable in Libya for four decades. But that was before the Tunisian and Egyptian uprisings embraced the power of the Internet. Now Libyans are hoping their revolution will also be tweeted.

This week, the video-sharing Web site YouTube was inundated by amateur footage of violent anti-government protests that rocked the second-largest city of Benghazi Tuesday.

The footage was picked up by major international news organisations and a multitude of Twitter users and Facebook pages as Libyan opposition groups prepared for Thursday’s “Day of Rage”.”

From France24

The Hopeful Network

“CAIRO — Most of the world got a crash course in the Egyptian opposition movement this month, as mass protests broke out on the streets of Cairo. From all appearances, the movement emerged organically in the wake of the overthrow of the government in nearby Tunisia, as hundreds of thousands of angry citizens turned out to demand President Hosni Mubarak immediately step down. Several days after the marches began, former International Atomic Energy Agency chief and Nobel Peace Prize laureate Mohamed ElBaradei arrived on the scene to give the marchers in the streets a nominal leader and media-savvy public face. And shortly after that, Egypt’s largest opposition group, the Muslim Brotherhood, joined in, lending its political heft to the movement.

But the groundwork for the Egyptian uprising was set well before these high-profile figures and organizations became involved. Nearly three years ago, a group of youth activists with a strong sense of Internet organizing and more than a little help from abroad was preparing for a grassroots, high-tech opposition movement.”

From Foreign Policy

Publications

Reports and Research Briefs Director Ron Deibert’s blog posts provide summaries and analysis of Citizen Lab research reports, and can be found here. Masashi Crete-Nishihata, Lotus Ruan, Jakub Dalek, and Jeffrey Knockel. “Managing the message: What you can’t say about the 19th National Communist Party Congress on WeChat,” Citizen Lab Research Brief No. 103, November… Read more »

People

Faculty Ronald J. Deibert Professor of Political Science Director, The Citizen Lab email: r.deibert at utoronto.ca (pgp) Staff Masashi Crete-Nishihata Research Manager, The Citizen Lab email: masashi at citizenlab.ca (pgp) Christopher Parsons Research Associate, The Citizen Lab email: christopher at christopher-parsons.com Jakub Dalek Senior Researcher, The Citizen Lab email: jakub.dalek at utoronto.ca (pgp) Jane Gowan Graphic… Read more »