Search Results for: ethiopia

For Their Eyes Only: The Commercialization of Digital Spying

Citizen Lab is pleased to announce the release of “For Their Eyes Only: The Commercialization of Digital Spying.”  The report features new findings, as well as consolidating a year of our research on the commercial market for offensive computer network intrusion capabilities developed by Western companies.

You Only Click Twice: FinFisher’s Global Proliferation

This post describes the results of a comprehensive global Internet scan for the command and control servers of FinFisher’s surveillance software. It also details the discovery of a campaign using FinFisher in Ethiopia that may have been used to target individuals linked to an opposition group. Additionally, it provides examination of a FinSpy Mobile sample found in the wild, which appears to have been used in Vietnam.

The SmartPhone Who Loved Me: FinFisher Goes Mobile?

This report, written and coordinated by Citizen Lab Technical Advisor Morgan Marquis-Boire, analyzes several samples we believe to be mobile variants of the FinFisher Spy Kit targeting iPhone, Android, Blackberry, Windows Mobile and Symbian platforms. It is a follow-on to a previous research brief, From Bahrain with Love: FinFisher's Spy Kit Exposed?, that analyzed several pieces of malware targeting Bahraini dissidents.

Citizen Lab Newsletter Archives

Archives of Citizen Lab Briefing newsletters we’ve sent. Subscribe to the Citizen Lab newsletter. Privacy Policy 2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 2018 January 2018 – This month’s round-up: spying on the cheap, fitness trackers leaking military secrets, and breaking through Iranian censorship 2017 November 2017 – Ethiopian dissidents targeted with spyware,… Read more »

Attacks on the Press 2010: Internet Analysis

“For the past decade, those who used the Internet to report the news might have assumed that the technological edge was in their favor. But online journalists now face more than just the standard risks to those working in dangerous conditions. They find themselves victims of new attacks unique to the new medium.

Ronald Deibert and Nart Villeneuve of the University of Toronto’s Citizen Lab, in partnership with computer security consultants at the SecDev Group, have conducted some of the most detailed postmortems of online attacks on the press, including the malware sent to Chinese foreign correspondents, and a forthcoming examination of Burma’s DDOS incidents. Their academic work firmly states that they cannot connect such events directly to the Chinese or Burmese states. Deibert says the evidence they have collected does show, however, that both attacks utilized techniques and strategies common to petty cyber-criminals, including individual “hackers” who work simply for the thrill of bringing down a highly visible, but vulnerable target.”

From Committee to Protect Journalists

The joys of online activism

“There are many worrying trends in this modern era of globalisation, most notably the ease with which companies can operate and banks move money around, apparently outside any democratic parameters set by nations or an international community struggling to catch up with a rapidly liberalising context. But I have never been part of the ‘anti-globalisation’ movement because there are so many positive aspects to globalisation.”

From Guardian