Thailand

Posts tagged “Thailand”

Thai Twitter users face prison if they tweet during election

Source: The Next Web

With the 2011 Thai General Election fast approaching, the nation is gearing up to embrace what could herald a new chapter for the country, and revitalize its democracy after more than 5 years of political crisis.

But news has emerged that Thais could face a stint in jail and a hefty fine if they’re caught commenting on any of the candidates or the parties on Twitter – or any other digital channel – in the build up to the election.

For full original article, see here

Thailand charges US citizen with insulting royals

“A US citizen has been charged in Thailand with insulting the monarchy after he posted material deemed offensive on his blog and put a link to a banned book, authorities said Friday.

Thai-born Lerpong Wichaikhammat, 54, was arrested on Tuesday in Nakhon Ratchasima province in northeast Thailand and is currently being held at Bangkok Remand Prison.

“He translated articles which are deemed insulting to the monarchy and posted them on his blog. Also he provided a link to a book” perceived as critical of the royal family, said police Lieutenant Colonel Kovit Tardmee.”

For full original article, see here

Grim future for Thai netizens

“Civil rights groups, advocates for freedom of expression, online media and netizens are all up in arms against the new computer crime bill which will replace the existing law that has been in force since July 18, 2007. They have a good reason to fear and despise the new law, which they believe will make the current legislation, already condemned as repressive, seem mild in comparison.

Evidence abounds as to how bad the current Computer Crime Act is. Ever since the law came into force four years ago, many tens of thousands of websites and web pages have been cached, blocked, blacklisted or shut down by the chief law enforcer, the Ministry of Information and Communications Technology.”

From Bangkok Post

Thai Internet restrictions may be delayed

“Activists say Thailand’s prime minister has assured them that proposed legislation tightening restrictions on the Internet will not be rushed into law.

Prime Minister Abhisit Vejjajiva met Tuesday with concerned Internet users who are demanding that proposed revisions to the already restrictive Computer Crime Act not be finalized without a full public review.”

From The Globe and Mail

13 years in prison for posting three messages on website criticizing king

“Reporters Without Borders deplores the 13-year jail sentence that a Bangkok court imposed on 15 March on Thanthawut Taweewarodomkul, the administrator of website linked to the anti-government Red Shirt Movement, for three messages critical of the king that he allegedly posted on the site, called Nor Por Chor USA.

Thanthawut, who has been detained since his arrest on 1 April 2010, was given a 10-year sentence under a section of the criminal code covering lèse-majesté and a three-year sentence under the Computer Crime Act.”

From Reporters Without Borders

Thailand: can internet be free again?

“Its massive and expensive programme of Internet censorship has made Thailand one of the world’s most censored nations. To date, the nation has either blocked or shut down 65,000 websites, and often for no other reason than that they were apparently run by one of the many factions of the political opposition, the red shirts

Many claim that at no step in internet censorship is there oversight, accountability or responsibility. Former ICT minister Ranongruk Suwunchwee once described the process as a routine one, in which she never became involved. Both she and the current minister, Juti Krairiksh, have publicly promised to vet the ‘Net for illegal references or libel concerning the high institution”.”

From The Bangkok Post

Jiew’s trial adjourned until September for further witness testimony

“The trial of the news website Prachatai’s editor, Chiranuch Premchaiporn, has been adjourned until 1 September with the agreement of her lawyers.

As it has been taking longer than expected to hear the testimony of the prosecution witness, the court decided to postpone the hearings planned for 15, 16 and 17 February. The nine prosecution witnesses will now be heard in September, and the defence witness will give their evidence in October.”

From Reporters Without Borders