Search Results for: hacking team

Cyberwar Is Harder Than It Looks

“In wartime, combatants often attempt to disrupt their enemies’ supply systems, generally by blowing them up. Modern life is made possible by a set of tightly interconnected systems supplying us with electricity, water, natural gas, automobile fuels, sewage treatment, food, finance, telecommunications, and emergency response. All of these systems are increasingly directed and monitored through the Internet. Would it be possible for our enemies to disrupt these vital systems by “blowing up” the Net?

“You have to be cautious when hearing from people engaging in fear-mongering about huge blackouts and collapses of critical infrastructures via the Internet,” University of Toronto cyberwarfare expert Ronald Deibert writes in the January/February 2011 Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists. “There is a lot of redundancy in the networks; it’s not a simple thing to turn off the power grid.””

From Reason

In cyberspy vs. cyberspy, China has the edge

“As America and China grow more economically and financially intertwined, the two nations have also stepped up spying on each other. Today, most of that is done electronically, with computers rather than listening devices in chandeliers or human moles in tuxedos.

And at the moment, many experts believe China may have gained the upper hand.

Though it is difficult to ascertain the true extent of America’s own capabilities and activities in this arena, a series of secret diplomatic cables as well as interviews with experts suggest that when it comes to cyber-espionage, China has leaped ahead of the United States.”

From The Globe and Mail

Israel mulls creation of elite counter-cyberterrorist unit

“Israel is mulling the creation of a counter-cyberterrorism unit designed to safeguard both government agencies and core private sector firms against hacking attacks.

The proposed unit would supplement the efforts of Mossad and other agencies in fighting cyberespionage and denial of service attacks. Israel is, of course, a prime target for hackers from the Muslim world.

The country’s hi-tech industries also make it an interesting target for cyberespionage from government-sponsored hackers from China and elsewhere.”

From The Register

The RSA Hack: How They Did It

“How did a hacker manage to infiltrate one of the world’s top computer-security companies? And could the data that was stolen be used to impair its SecurID products, which are used by 40 million businesses that are trying to keep their own networks safe from intruders?

In the attack on RSA, the attacker sent “phishing” e-mails with the subject line “2011 Recruitment Plan” to two small groups of employees over the course of two days. Unfortunately, one was interested enough to retrieve one of these messages from his or her junk mail and open the attached Excel file. The spreadsheet contained malware that used a previously unknown, or “zero-day,” flaw in Adobe’s Flash software to install a backdoor. RSA said that Adobe had since released a patch to fix that hole.”

From The New York Times

W5: Investigating Canada’s big cyber security problem

Here’s something Canadian authorities don’t want you to know: whether its people, organizations, businesses or governments, we are all at risk of being victims of cyber attacks.

“We have major cyber security problems in this country,” says Ron Deibert, director of The Citizen Lab, at the University of Toronto. “The problem is nobody wants you to know about it.”

From CTV News

Meet the hacktivist who tried to take down the government

“Many believe “hacktivism”, or online activism, is a legitimate form of protest but this young man quickly discovered the authorities believe otherwise.

Matthew George loved the internet. The 22-year-old confessed loner from Newcastle used to spend almost all of his waking hours online in chat rooms and social networking sites.

But in October 2009 this online existence was suddenly threatened. The Rudd government had announced its plan to censor the internet. George was outraged. George would now add political activism to his previously mundane internet activities, as he began communicating with members of the internet activist group Anonymous.”

From The Sydney Morning Herald

Lush website hack sees customers defrauded

“Handmade cosmetics group Lush has admitted its website was hacked repeatedly by fraudsters over the past three months, putting thousands of customers at risk of having their card details stolen. But the company only informed customers last night.

The fact that Lush is warning customers to contact their banks may indicate it has failed to encrypt the details held on its site – which, if true, could mean it has failed to meet regulations known as PCI compliance, which governs the storage of card details by websites in Europe.

Many customers are also speculating why it took Lush so long to inform customers if the website was first hacked in October, especially as its statement indicates it has 24-hour web security.”

From The Guardian

Iran seeks to boost corps of web watchers

“DUBAI, United Arab Emirates – Iran’s top police chief envisions a new beat for his forces: patrolling cyberspace.

‘There is no time to wait,’ Gen. Ismail Ahmadi Moghaddam said last week at the opening of a new police headquarters in the Shiite seminary city of Qom. ‘We will have cyber police all over Iran.’

The first web watchdog squads are planned in Tehran this month — another step in Iran’s rapidly expanding focus on the digital world as cyber warfare and online sleuthing take greater prominence with the Pentagon’s new Cyber Command and the secrets spilled to WikiLeaks.”

From Yahoo! News